Posted By Ed B

This post started out as a comment at Returning to Faith.

Social Justice, as commonly understood (by it's practitioners) today, is a synonym for socialism.
The government doing the redistribution thing under the guise of "justice".
Justice is harsh, I'll take grace and mercy. The self-righteous want "justice".

Old Testament Jewish landowners owned the land.
God, however, mandated that they harvest in such a way that there is something left to glean. God being the government, leaves something for charity.
But God did not mandate the landowners to clear-cut and give a portion to the poor.
He made them give the poor an opportunity to work for their sustenance.
They would harvest what they did not sow. Some honest effort without investment.
I've often felt that if we want a "Christian Nation", that nation would be charitable to it's poor.
That would not be "work-fare", or a "jobs program", but the opportunity to work for a living, and the encouragement of private charity (tax breaks).

I read a blog called Think Christian, which leans more to liberal christian theology, and get frustrated often by the world-view, but it makes me realize that there are a number of Christ-Dedicated People (maybe that's what I'll name my denomination if I ever start one), that don't have my political/economic views (which I believe are bible-derived).
We can't all be perfect.
If I get any kind of "socialism" from reading the bible, it's expected (not mandated) within the church, not the world at large.
As an evangelistic outreach, charitable activity by churches is a good idea, but the ROI is numerically small.
Then again, so was Jesus' sacrifice on the cross.


 
1 Comment(s):
Rita said...
Wow. Those last two sentences are....perfect.
September 29, 2011 07:12:50
 
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Ed B
Ypsilanti, MI

 
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